WTF ... IS WTF!?
We are a collective of people who believe in freedom of speech, the rights of individuals, and free pancakes! We share our lives, struggles, frustrations, successes, joys, and prescribe to our own special brand of humor and insanity. If you are looking for a great place to hang out, make new friends, find new nemeses, and just be yourself, WTF.com is your new home.

9 year old Pakistani girl becomes a Microsoft Certified Professional

Jung

???
Premium
13,998
2,267
487
#1
http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/features/2005/may05/05-02YoungMCP.asp
Think Your Kid Is Smart? At Age 9, Girl in Pakistan Is a Microsoft Certified Professional

Gaining credentials as a Microsoft Certified Professional isn't child's play, but that hasn't fazed 9-year-old Arfa Karim Randhawa, one of the world's youngest MCPs.


At just 9 years old, Arfa Karim Randhawa, of Faisalabad, Pakistan, is one of the youngest MCPs in the world.

REDMOND, Wash., May 2, 2005 --- The Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) credential is for technology professionals who have the skills to successfully implement a Microsoft product or technology as part of a business solution. At just 9 years old, Arfa Karim Randhawa , of Faisalabad, Pakistan, is one of the youngest MCPs in the world. She recently received her credentials from Emre Berkin, chairman of Microsoft's Europe, Middle East and Africa region, and Jawwad Rehman, Microsoft's country manager for Pakistan. Via e-mail, Randhawa recently discussed how the child of an agricultural family came to achieve this status and what it means to her and her family.

PressPass: When did you first become interested in computers?

Arfa: At the age of 5, when I was in kindergarten, I often used to pass by the computer labs and see students doing work on computers. I realized that calculation, which would take us a long time to do, can be done in less than a second with the help of computers. So that is how my interest in computers began. I started to explore computers on my own and first used one at the age of 6, when I was in first grade. Then I went to Applied Technologies (APTECH) for further studies.

PressPass: Why did you decide to pursue MCP certification?

Arfa: When I went to APTECH, my teachers, keeping in view my aim and age, decided that I should go for a certification of Microsoft. Because of my interest in software development, they decided that I should go for my MCP. It took me four months, and I did it during my summer vacation.

PressPass: What does it mean to you to receive this honor?

Arfa: It means a lot to me, because it helped me get recognition worldwide and to fulfill the dreams of my parents, especially my late grandfather, Ch. Abdul Karim Randhawa. I am thankful to Almighty Allah and my teachers, without whom I could not have achieved this honor. This is just the beginning.

PressPass: How have your family and friends reacted?

Arfa: The reaction of my family and friends was, naturally, very exciting. They are exhilarated and very much proud of me. My father provided me the opportunities, the required hardware, various software and the main thing, which is my confidence level.

I live in Faisalabad, a major industrial city of Pakistan. Faisalabad is called "Manchester of Pakistan," and it is famous for its cloth industry. I belong to a purely agricultural family from a rural background. My late grandfather was an unlettered scholar and had a great passion for higher education for his next generation. My father is serving with a U.N. peacekeeping force in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. My mother is a landlady and looks after the land affairs in the absence of my father. I have two younger brothers, named Sarmad and Dawood, ages 7 and 3, respectively. Prior to me, no one in my family is in the field of IT, but I can feel that my brothers are following my footsteps very anxiously and enthusiastically. They are posing a constant challenge to my world record.

PressPass: Have you ever visited America?

Arfa: I have not visited America as of now. However, I would love to come to the United States, for two reasons. Firstly, I would like to pay a visit to Disneyland. Secondly, I would like to meet Bill Gates.

PressPass: What are your impressions of Microsoft?

Arfa: Microsoft has changed the way people think about computers. Microsoft has laid down the foundations for next-generation computing and is the founder in terms of providing user-friendly software--thereby increasing the number of novice users. I like the way Microsoft participates in other-than-mainstream activities, such as academic research, charities, scholarships and connecting the disconnected by providing technology support to underserved people. Microsoft develops a lot of software that allows people to realize their potential. This is exactly what my experience is with Microsoft. I have a passion for software, and Microsoft provides me a true platform.

PressPass: Would you ever want to work at Microsoft?

Arfa: I would definitely like to work at Microsoft, since software development and exploring new technologies has always been my passion, and Microsoft is best when it comes to next-generation software technologies. Technology evangelism has always been my passion since I learned how to use computers. Not only I would like to work as the youngest technology evangelist at Microsoft, I would like to work on those cutting-edge technologies which would be explored by technology evangelists five years from now. Moreover, I would love to visit Microsoft headquarters at Redmond. I have dreamt a lot about the Redmond campus. I have visualized in my dreams so many times the working environment of Microsoft. I would like to see the labs where Microsoft Visual Studio .NET and the Microsoft .NET Framework have been developed.

PressPass: What other kinds of activities or hobbies do you enjoy?

Arfa: Computers, singing, reading, painting and gardening are my hobbies. I have won a singing competition at the national level. I keep my self updated by reading different books and encyclopedias.

PressPass: Do you have any advice for other young people?

Arfa: I have a message for the kids across the globe: If you want to do something big in your life, you must remember that shyness is only in the mind. If you think shy, you act shy. But if you think confident, you act confident. Therefore, never let shyness conquer your mind.
This either speaks volumes about the intelligence of this young lady, or volumes about why MCP certifications are worthless. I'm not sure what to think. I'm hoping it's just the former, although deep down I know the latter to be true.
 

bnccoder

Postaholic
2,479
0
36
#2
Do they have child labor laws there?
 

Jung

???
Premium
13,998
2,267
487
#4
bnccoder said:
Do they have child labor laws there?
I seriously doubt she's going to be doing any IT work. It was probably just somehting to do, so she could say she did it.
 

UberSkippy

a.k.a. FuckTheBullShit
7,529
63
142
#5
junglizm said:
This either speaks volumes about the intelligence of this young lady, or volumes about why MCP certifications are worthless. I'm not sure what to think. I'm hoping it's just the former, although deep down I know the latter to be
true.
How could you think something so venerable as the MCSE program is useless? HOW? Just because there are a lot of "paper MCSE's" floating around?

I'd like to think this one proves both points. She's smart, the MCP is useless. But for a 9 year old that's still a hell of an accomplisment. I just wonder which one she got?
 

Jung

???
Premium
13,998
2,267
487
#6
UberSkippy said:
How could you think something so venerable as the MCSE program is useless? HOW? Just because there are a lot of "paper MCSE's" floating around?
First off, I"m MCSE/SA 2003. The MCP program is horribly flawed; you only need 56% to pass, that's pretty low ball seeing as most other certs require at least 70%. The 'paper MCSEs' do attribute to it a lot though, I've personally let go a few of them at my job. Anyone can read and retain 56% worth of information until the test. That's not to say that they're qualified to help manage a network, or even trouble shoot one.

For the most part, IT certs are worthless. They only get you interviews, and hardly anyone hires solely based upon them anymore. Not to mention that the entire field is flooded with clueless MCSEs. I'd even go out on a limb and say that the only certs even worth getting anymore are Cisco certs, LPI or CISSP type certs.

Event then, I see certs as something a company pays you to get, to help them keep cost of operations down. Not something you pay for out of your pocket to help you get a job.
She's smart, the MCP is useless. But for a 9 year old that's still a hell of an accomplisment. I just wonder which one she got?
MCP is part of every one of their other certification paths. MCP is the first certification you get, upon completion of your first test; all MCSE/SA/etc's were once MCPs, actually they still are.

I agree that it's a notable accomplishment for a 9 year old. Although, I think 9 years old should be outside playing, or playing CS, not getting IT certifications.

I was wondering what cert she got too, I'm guessing XP Pro though.
 

Descent

Hella Constipated
7,686
165
157
#9
JNG said:
Cisco certs, LPI or CISSP type certs.
By the time I graduate high school I'll have one of those. My district gives you free community college :D.

However, it's a VERY GOOD community college, and the Cisco room is a $600,000 investment, and is always kept up to date. I walked in and I was amazed.

Also, the Computer Repair portion is great because they use rejected PC's, Pentium I-III era Dell OptiPlexes, and if you break it they don't give a shit. They just pick a new one off the stack.

The P1-3 OptiPlexes are also great teaching tools, IMO, because their custom form factor lays everything out in front of you, and is modular so you can inspect parts and learn about them. I personally owned a P2-300 OptiPlex with 328MB of RAM, an 8MB ATi brand Rage Pro PCI (Overclocked to 105 Core/115 Memory, AKA MAX SETTINGS, STABLE!), a 1.5GB HD, and Windows 98 SE.

It was a very good box, but it ran my DOS games too fast and I decided to get rid of it. I think the P2-300 combined with the world's fastest Rage Pro (Which has 2D speed that is ORGASMIC) that OCed to BIOS LIMITS and PC100 RAM kind of made games like Descent and Wolf3D a bit too quick :p.
 
4,149
2
0
#11
bnccoder said:
Do they have child labor laws there?
Actually, I would believe it if they didn't. A lot of countries in that area and third world countries have families that are so poor that they depend on income from their children to make money for the family to eat. America is one of the few countries that frowns upon children working. To other cultures it is nothing.
 

UberSkippy

a.k.a. FuckTheBullShit
7,529
63
142
#12
junglizm said:
First off, I"m MCSE/SA 2003. The MCP program is horribly flawed; you only need 56% to pass, that's pretty low ball seeing as most other certs require at least 70%. The 'paper MCSEs' do attribute to it a lot though, I've personally let go a few of them at my job. Anyone can read and retain 56% worth of information until the test. That's not to say that they're qualified to help manage a network, or even trouble shoot one.

For the most part, IT certs are worthless. They only get you interviews, and hardly anyone hires solely based upon them anymore. Not to mention that the entire field is flooded with clueless MCSEs. I'd even go out on a limb and say that the only certs even worth getting anymore are Cisco certs, LPI or CISSP type certs.

Event then, I see certs as something a company pays you to get, to help them keep cost of operations down. Not something you pay for out of your pocket to help you get a job.

MCP is part of every one of their other certification paths. MCP is the first certification you get, upon completion of your first test; all MCSE/SA/etc's were once MCPs, actually they still are.

I agree that it's a notable accomplishment for a 9 year old. Although, I think 9 years old should be outside playing, or playing CS, not getting IT certifications.

I was wondering what cert she got too, I'm guessing XP Pro though.
I guess I shoulda mentioned that I too have done the MCP program. I took one and realized it was pointless.

I agree, certs mean diddly. All a cert tells me is that you can read a book. I worked with an MCSE that did not understand what FDISK was.