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Anyone writing XUL (Zool) apps?

Jung

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Has anyone gotten into XUL (XML User Interface) yet? It's Mozilla's baby, you can use it, and javascript, to create extensions and add-on applicatioons. Pretty interesting stuff. I've been working on an extension for another forum. Their SOAP interface looks interesting as well.


http://www.xulplanet.com/
What is XUL?

XUL is an XML language and you can use numerous existing standards including XSLT, XPath and DOM functions to manipulate a user interface, all supported directly by Gecko. In fact, XUL is powerful enough that the entire user interface in the Mozilla application is implemented in XUL.

In addition to the many built-in user interface widgets available in XUL, you may create additional custom widgets using a related language called the Extensible Bindings Language (XBL). This language may be used to create custom tags and implement custom functionality.

XUL applications may be either opened directly from a remote Web site, or may be downloaded by the user and installed. Mozilla's XPInstall technology allows an application to be placed on a remote site and installed using only a couple of clicks of the mouse. No searching though the file system for an installer or stepping through a lengthy install process. The benefit of installing an application is lowered security restrictions so that applications may read and write files, and access user preferences and system information.

XUL may also be used to create standalone applications that embed the Gecko engine or may be used as part of the browser. A feature in XUL called an overlay allows a third party to create extensions to the browser itself, for example to add a custom toolbar, change menus, or add other features. This feature is popular in Mozilla Firefox -- there are almost 100 extensions available. Mozilla's upcoming mail client Thunderbird also has a number of extensions available. In fact, any XUL application can support extensions.

Gecko also supports various Web Services technologies such as XML-RPC, SOAP and WSDL. These technologies have been used recently to create an application to browse for products on amazon.com.