Gaming Boomer gaming thread

Jung

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Making this mostly to post links so they don't get lost in the shoutbox. Feel free to post anything related to old games here.

These are modern-ish clients for some of the old FPS we've been talking about.



Quake 1/Quakeworld
nQuake (most common client for MP)
fte (QW compatible but better graphics, particles and in-game updater)

Quake 2
Quetoo
Yamagi
Q2vkpt (ray traced version for non-RTX cards)

Quake 3ish
Open Arena (compatible with q3 servers)
Xonotic (standalone game, my fave. can play Q3 maps.)
Warfork (standalone)
DeFRag (movement/trick jumping standalone.)

Half Life 1 DM
Adrenaline Gamer

Half Life 1 SP
GoldSRRC package (unpatched version with all the fun bs, plus mods and maps.)
Steam version is only $10 but bhop is capped at 550 and a lot of fun things are patched out. You get access to TFC etc with this as well tho.

Half Life 2 SP
Ghosting Mod (unpatched 1.0 version with fwd bhop, prop flying etc and some speedrunning mods)

Counter Strike pre-retail beta
CS beta 6.1 (wall bangs everywhere ;) )

Unreal Tournament 99/goty
UT99 download
patch instructions
 
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Jung

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Half Life 1 and expansions, and I think all the MP mods like TFC, are free to play on Steam for the next 7 weeks. If you've never played them, might as well. Opposing Force is the best imo.
 
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Is this PC-based or can it be played on PS4?

* sort of randomly asking for a friend
 

Jason

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Another old game (pre-internet) from The Sierra Network / The Imagination Network reborn: The Shadow of Yserbius

 
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Jung

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@CoprophagousCop Team Fortress is possibly one of the best FPS ever made, although the older versions are much better than TF2. When Valve released the Steam beta they included ports of Quake1 MP (death match classic) and TF on their engine for free.

It came out in 1999. It started off as a Quake mod, but was then ported to GoldSrc, the Half Life engine.
I'm proud of you, grasshopper.
 
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Jung

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If that is the case, I sure could not tell based on that video. The levels in that video looked pretty lame.
I mean it came out in 99. It's basically the quake1 engine with better lighting and physics. Even today, there isn't a ctf experience that can compete with it imo.
 

CoprophagousCop

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I mean it came out in 99. It's basically the quake1 engine with better lighting and physics. Even today, there isn't a ctf experience that can compete with it imo.
OK, I went back and re-watched the video to see if I was missing something .. Nope. There is not much detail or interactivity in the levels. About half way through the video there was a room with a bunch of crates, which looked somewhat interesting, but everything else looked pretty dull.

The game I played most, back in the day, was Duke Nukem 3D. It came out in 1996 and had a less advanced engine than the one used in Team Fortress, yet the levels were highly interactive with buttons to press, elevators to ride, doors to open and close, lights to turn on and off, glass to break, cameras that peer into other parts of the level... I did not see any of these things in the above video. The levels in Duke Nukem 3D also contained details such as furniture and signs. Much of the game play required moving through the levels cautiously. There were lots of aliens to shoot, even when playing in death match mode. I bought a bunch of third-party CD-ROMs that contained hundreds of levels made by fans of the game. The Team Fortress levels look like some of the less sophisticated levels from these CD-ROMs.

Duke Nukem 3D came with an application to create your own levels, though it was extremely buggy. I probably spent more time creating my own levels than playing the actual game. I would combine various special effects to make new effects. I made televisions that could switch channels with the press of a button. I made a button-controlled elevator with doors that automatically closed and opened. I made vehicles that moved and crashed through other objects. I formed 3D objects that you could see both over and under at the same time, something the engine did not inherently support, by using a series of 2D sprites positioned flat horizontally and vertically.

Maybe you guys never saw or played Duke Nukem 3D, in which case you guys missed out. @BRiT: It also had strippers you could kill.
 

BeautifulSniper

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OK, I went back and re-watched the video to see if I was missing something .. Nope. There is not much detail or interactivity in the levels. About half way through the video there was a room with a bunch of crates, which looked somewhat interesting, but everything else looked pretty dull.

The game I played most, back in the day, was Duke Nukem 3D. It came out in 1996 and had a less advanced engine than the one used in Team Fortress, yet the levels were highly interactive with buttons to press, elevators to ride, doors to open and close, lights to turn on and off, glass to break, cameras that peer into other parts of the level... I did not see any of these things in the above video. The levels in Duke Nukem 3D also contained details such as furniture and signs. Much of the game play required moving through the levels cautiously. There were lots of aliens to shoot, even when playing in death match mode. I bought a bunch of third-party CD-ROMs that contained hundreds of levels made by fans of the game. The Team Fortress levels look like some of the less sophisticated levels from these CD-ROMs.

Duke Nukem 3D came with an application to create your own levels, though it was extremely buggy. I probably spent more time creating my own levels than playing the actual game. I would combine various special effects to make new effects. I made televisions that could switch channels with the press of a button. I made a button-controlled elevator with doors that automatically closed and opened. I made vehicles that moved and crashed through other objects. I formed 3D objects that you could see both over and under at the same time, something the engine did not inherently support, by using a series of 2D sprites positioned flat horizontally and vertically.

Maybe you guys never saw or played Duke Nukem 3D, in which case you guys missed out. @BRiT: It also had strippers you could kill.
Ok casual