WTF ... IS WTF!?
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Calling all IT professionals

For-Starters

Banned - What an Asshat!
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for_starters has a few questions for all the IT pro's here at wtf.com :D

Well, as you may or may not know, I was accepted into an engineering program.

This decision is not set in stone, and I could still transfer into another program if I wanted to.

I've always been quite fascinated by the world of computers and technology. So now I'm thinking that I should major in Comp-Sci.

My question to you IT professionals is: are careers in the IT industry rewarding and challenging? What's the pay like? If you had a choice to go back to when you were deciding on a career, would you enter the IT world again?

Sinew said this somewhere. In Infotech class we did basic C++ and Java. When many of the other students were fooling around and playing games, (not Sinew of course) I found myself working hard on the C++ programs that were assigned. I found it quite fun and challenging, and overall enjoyed it quite a bit.

While loops are the best. :D

Talk to me IT geniuses. :p

I look forward to reading what you all have to say. :cool:
 

Jason

Voorhees a jolly good fellow!
Founder
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#2
Damnit if you're going to flame like that, take it to the Bai...err..shit.

Fuck, you got me that time. ;)
 

voiceofreason

Seeker of Truth
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for_starters said:
for_starters has a few questions for all the IT pro's here at wtf.com :D

Well, as you may or may not know, I was accepted into an engineering program.

This decision is not set in stone, and I could still transfer into another program if I wanted to.

I've always been quite fascinated by the world of computers and technology. So now I'm thinking that I should major in Comp-Sci.

My question to you IT professionals is: are careers in the IT industry rewarding and challenging? What's the pay like? If you had a choice to go back to when you were deciding on a career, would you enter the IT world again?

Sinew said this somewhere. In Infotech class we did basic C++ and Java. When many of the other students were fooling around and playing games, (not Sinew of course) I found myself working hard on the C++ programs that were assigned. I found it quite fun and challenging, and overall enjoyed it quite a bit.

While loops are the best. :D

Talk to me IT geniuses. :p

I look forward to reading what you all have to say. :cool:
Honestly, I think your ideal profession includes a fryalator. But if you must, here's my 2 cents.

Yes, IT can be rewarding. Building things, NOT being a Windows monkey.

The money is good, but you have to be able to do a lot of things.

Starting out as a programmer is a good idea. You have to make your bones.

But pushing code all day everyday, forever, will make you mental. After a while you have to be able to manage projects, or you won't make big money.
 

MaxPower

You're my number two
Staff
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#4
The first thing you need to do is decide which you Really want to do. That is the most important part of your decision.

Any of the engineering trades can be financially, and mentally rewarding, as well as bring you, prominence. They can all, be very challenging as well. So, the way I see it, just pick the one your heart tells you to go with.

Regarding your question about the IT people here, You may want to get, insights from moleros, and I think britt is a software engineer. They may also be able to fill you in on their perspective ends of the business.

As for the IT industry as a whole, you'll find that if you decide to go that way; there will be a whole subset of fields to explore. The shape of the IT industry has been (as are many) driven by the economy, and industry needs. You'll find now less, and less "Specialists". It's a good idea in any field to gain focus, but you'll also find that to survive, you need to be versed in a number of technologies. It depends really on where you want to go.
From my experience, I went the way of network specialist, things like Cisco, Nortel, Adtran. I found that the hardware end alone wasn't cutting it, So even though I new windows well; I felt it was time to get more formal training on the server platforms (NT, 2000, then 2003). Somewhere in the middle of all that I decide to study more of the design side. This is a whole other ball game. With Implementation all you really need to do is configure the equipment you're given, run some cables, and sometimes think on your feet to fix an issue one of the design guys missed. (PM me and I'll give you some specific examples) If you can get really astute at both Design Engineering & Field Engineering, you're halfway home. Now all you have to do is stay current, and maybe learn a bit more than the next guy.

It never ends, every time you learn a new technology, the guys in the ivory tower decide to make you learn some associated new flavor. Not that I really mind. When I go to either a simple vendor training or a more in-depth boot camp or something; I get my ballistic learning groove on. I go all out, get a lot of sleep, take one of those B12 based memory pills in the AM; Anything I can think of to make sure I slurp up as much information as possible. The more you can learn the more you'll have to offer. The more you have to offer, the more interesting projects come your way.

When I first started working Where I am now, all they really did was manufacture/sell cables, fiber-optic assemblies, racks, all that boring crap. I was their in-house Director of IT. That was 1997. A few months into it I tried to promote the idea of adding systems integration to our list of products and services. A few months after that they took my advice, after some numb nuts said "You know I was reading about this Cisco Systems, we can maybe make some money". <<Really long story in between>>> Here we are today designing and implementing a wide variety of geek gear world wide. Guess who is now the do it all Sys engineer now. My main focus has shifted from end user to service provider. So in one company I came in as head of the IT dept. and moved on to head of our private network engineering team. Why? Because I saw an opportunity and opened my big ugly mug.

The whole thing is you gotta "be the fluid". You need to see where the market is going and somehow, manage to find a nitch, while not getting too embedded and isolated from things on the horizon.

If you want some good places to find IT related resources and hear a number of Geeks stories, email me at MaxPower AT Endmedia Dot NET.