WTF ... IS WTF!?
We are a collective of people who believe in freedom of speech, the rights of individuals, and free pancakes! We share our lives, struggles, frustrations, successes, joys, and prescribe to our own special brand of humor and insanity. If you are looking for a great place to hang out, make new friends, find new nemeses, and just be yourself, WTF.com is your new home.

Fitness app Strava exposes the location of military bases

Jason

Voorhees a jolly good fellow!
Founder
6,863
5,108
537
Strava, the popular app for tracking running, cycling and swimming, is not the most obvious go-to for exposing national secrets, but a heatmap of activity from users has been found to unearth the locations of U.S. military bases worldwide.

The company’s review of 2017 showed all routes taken by its users across the world. It was released back in November 2017, but it came to the fore this weekend when Australian student Nathan Ruser noticed that trails from Strava users in certain countries made it possible to identify military from the U.S. and other nations.

While many major cities and regions are brightly colored due to huge amounts of activity, military locations stand out as hubs of activity in quieter areas, such as Syria, Afghanistan or Somalia. That’s exacerbated by the fact that the app is more popular in the West than places like the Middle East or Africa.

Strava allows its users to record their exercise via GPS using a phone or wearable devices like Fitbit, which have been given out to U.S. forces in the past.

In most cases, the public data can be useful. It can help find new trails to run, find routes in new places or even identify other runners to exercise with or compete against. With over one billion activities logged in the heat map, it provides an interesting look at how many people in the world exercise.

The service does offer a private mode which doesn’t share information outside of the app. The company said its heatmap is based on public data only. It would appear, then, that military personnel are sharing their information publicly, perhaps without knowing it or realizing the implication.

Source: Tech Crunch
 

Danni

Derp in the North
Premium
10,555
3,542
487
Mattis is reviewing base usage of fitness trackers.

Right now, we haven’t gotten any media queries regarding it, but I suspect we will in time depending on the outcome of operational security reviews.

As of this morning, all of Joint Base San Antonio’s data was scrubbed.
 

ThisIsBananas

Silly Face!
834
353
107
Strava, the popular app for tracking running, cycling and swimming, is not the most obvious go-to for exposing national secrets, but a heatmap of activity from users has been found to unearth the locations of U.S. military bases worldwide.

The company’s review of 2017 showed all routes taken by its users across the world. It was released back in November 2017, but it came to the fore this weekend when Australian student Nathan Ruser noticed that trails from Strava users in certain countries made it possible to identify military from the U.S. and other nations.

While many major cities and regions are brightly colored due to huge amounts of activity, military locations stand out as hubs of activity in quieter areas, such as Syria, Afghanistan or Somalia. That’s exacerbated by the fact that the app is more popular in the West than places like the Middle East or Africa.

Strava allows its users to record their exercise via GPS using a phone or wearable devices like Fitbit, which have been given out to U.S. forces in the past.

In most cases, the public data can be useful. It can help find new trails to run, find routes in new places or even identify other runners to exercise with or compete against. With over one billion activities logged in the heat map, it provides an interesting look at how many people in the world exercise.

The service does offer a private mode which doesn’t share information outside of the app. The company said its heatmap is based on public data only. It would appear, then, that military personnel are sharing their information publicly, perhaps without knowing it or realizing the implication.

Source: Tech Crunch
Shittiest app ever. When I go for a jog, I don't want to talk to other joggers.