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Headlines Germany, France, China & USA

gurlgonewild

Was machen Sie?
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#1
how come no one talks about this type of hegemony?
i found two articles, the implications are interesting. please read at your leisure-this is something everyone needs to be aware of now. let history not repeat itself.


ARTICLE #1

http://www.iht.com/articles/2004/12/06/news/politicus.html

Politicus: Schröder and the U.S. still fencing on China
John Vinocur International Herald Tribune
Tuesday, December 7, 2004


BERLIN Just before he left on his current visit to China, Gerhard Schröder's staff confirmed that the chancellor was going to restate his support there for a plan to lift the European Union's embargo on selling arms to Beijing. Before the day was out on Friday, the U.S. State Department said again that it opposed Europe's dropping the ban, and that Colin Powell would be emphasizing the point during a trip to Brussels and the Hague later this week.

Schröder's pressing forward with the issue has a rather exceptional, or quixotic, aspect in that it clashes with both an EU consensus against supplying China with arms and motions passed by the Bundestag (widely supported by the chancellor's own coalition) and European Parliament urging that the embargo be retained.

Since Germany's military and strategic responsibilities in the Far East are virtually nil, Schröder's position demonstrates pretty substantial disregard for the American view that German and French arms sales to China (the real issue at hand) will not make Beijing less expansionist, more sensitive to human rights, or unvaryingly reliable.

Voices within the German government have said everyone should understand China feels itself "politically discriminated against." The idea has a violently counterinstinctive quality to it, but Schröder, who seems to want to cast himself as China's best friend in the West, may choose to make this case directly to George Bush when he travels to Europe in February in what is being described as a "reaching out" initiative by the White House.

If a proposed one-on-one Bush-Schröder meeting in Germany were to happen (it's not a sure thing), it would be tacked onto an appearance by the president in Brussels, involving both NATO and EU leaders. The grand idea there would be to proclaim a restoration of trans-Atlantic cooperation. In the German-American case, the get-together would be aimed at rekindling a notion of shared sentiment in a country where Michael Moore, as the newspaper Berliner Zeitung noted last week, creates a thousand times more enthusiasm than an explosion of democracy in Ukraine.

But some might dare ask, thinking of Schröder's stance on the China arms embargo, why insist? After all, in March of this year, Bush and Schröder met and signed the pompously named German American Alliance for the 21st Century. On paper, you couldn't bind the old democratic tutor and its onetime ward more tightly together, but schoolchildren are not exactly reciting the document by heart on both sides of the Atlantic.

In fact, whether the meeting takes place, and if it has an agenda with real content, is mostly up to the White House. The Bush administration can go for the "warm and fuzzy," obliterating any real discussion of big issues. Or choose hard talk, which means specifics like Germany and Europe's stance on arms for China, German noninvolvement in Iraq, whether the U.S. wants Schröder's Germany to have a UN Security Council seat (again, no sure thing), and on a more cosmic level, if Schröder is willing to make a public commitment to the Americans about a Europe of the future that does not define itself in opposition to the United States.

This last bit sounds quite exalted, but the Germans are talking cosmically about the start of a "strategic dialogue." The phrase "grand bargain" is out there, and it is "making its way around in the government," a German official said.

Basically, the grand bargain would go to what the Germans, on one side, see as American attempts "to complicate" European integration. Decoded, that means, in part, pressing the EU to make Turkey a member.

In exchange for the U.S. signaling that this not an obsessive American approach and that Eastern Europe can fully engage in the EU without paying the existential price of American disengagement as its security guarantor - details not provided - the Americans, according to the official, could get Germany's assurance that EU integration has nothing to do with creating an "emancipated" (the word is a Schröder favorite) European pole pitching itself to the world as a counterforce to the wild and irresponsible Americans.

As consensus views go, there is a fairly wide one in Europe that a "non-U.S.A." identity for Europe is firm if deniable French policy. This notion casts French and German resistance to the Iraq war as the basis of a genesis legend for a future Europe's arm's length relationship with the United States.

How much has Schröder the short-term tactician bought into this line? On one hand, better relations with the Americans, however desentimentalized, just might be a help when he likely seeks a third term in 2006. On the other, Schröder justified his actions on Iraq to his party leadership last year not so much in terms of international law or doubts about the existence of weapons of mass destruction, but as "protecting European sovereignty." He argued then that he and Jacques Chirac's decision to oppose the war would determine the development of Europe over the next 10 to 15 years.

This casting of Europe's development in opposition to America - the refrain goes the Iraq war had to be opposed to unite Europe in escaping America's hegemonic grasp - resurfaced in another form, according to accounts of Schröder's most recent trip to Asia, in October.

Jochen Buchsteiner, the politically astute Asia correspondent of the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, who accompanied Schröder to New Delhi and Hanoi, wrote that the trip revolved around a depiction of rivalry with America and an attempt to win capital from Germany's position on the Iraq war. He described Schröder as saying that a domineering power could only generate resistance, but out of embarrassment, avoiding any specific mention of the United States. Schröder's behavior in Asia, Buchsteiner reported, followed "an anti-Atlanticist direction" that resembled that of Chirac, who was in China at the same moment.

Since then, the German official explained, the government has been in the process of redefining its world role. Countering the German advocates of Euro-Gaullism, Schröder has been hearing arguments, he said, from a stronger force within his own house that insists that trying to integrate Europe on an anti-American premise would kill the EU, as would an EU leadership too palpably German and French.

Is hearing Schröder restate both the obvious and lukewarm - at least to Bush - worth a trip to Germany for the president? As Powell argued last week, Washington's "reaching out" has to be met by more than a repetition of "'Come on, United States, it's all your fault."'


ARTICLE #2

http://www.expatica.com/source/site...ory_id=14710&name=China+backs+German+UN+role+

China backs German UN role

6 December 2004

BEIJING - German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder met with Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao on Monday with Beijing giving Germany its backing for its quest for a seat on an expanded United Nations' Security Council as part of plans for reforming the UN.

Wen gave Schroeder China's backing for a German role in an enlarged United Nations Security Council, German officials said. "China supports Germany playing a proper role in the UN Security Council," the officials quoted him as saying.

It was Schroeder's sixth visit to China since winning power in September 1998 with the two sides marking the deepening relationship between Europe's biggest economy and the new Asian economic superpower by signing several major economic agreements.

In all 22 economic and political agreements worth some EUR 1.4 billion were signed, including an agreement for China to buy 23 Airbus A319, A320 and A321 aircraft.

But a key part of the talks between the leaders also focused on Iraq and reform of the Security Council, the UN's key decision-making body, with a plunging dollar also overhanging the Schroeder visit to China and Asia.

After China, Schroeder is to travel to Japan. Both the euro and the yen have raced ahead on forex markets as the dollar has fallen raising worries about the European and Japanese export machines.

A big question will be whether Schroeder is be able to draw Tokyo and Beijing in behind his campaign to press Washington to take a more active role in shoring up the dollar against the yen and the euro.

At the same time, Germany wants China to help ease upward pressure on the euro by releasing the yuan from its US dollar peg.

The fixed rate yuan has helped the euro rise to record highs against the dollar this year and European officials believe freeing up the yuan would take pressure off the strong euro which is causing concern because it makes eurozone exports more expensive.

Government officials said Japan is seen by Germany as a central political partner and that views between Berlin and Tokyo converge on most key issues including the United Nations, where both nations are seeking permanent seats on the Security Council.

But this being said, some analysts see Tokyo as a possible rival for Berlin in its Security Council ambitions with Japan's support for the Iraq war helping Tokyo to secure Washington's endorsement in its quest for a Security Council seat.

With Schroeder having spearheaded European opposition to the US military action in Iraq, Germany is not on Washington's list of star candidates for the proposed enlarged Security Council.

As a result, the talks over UN reforms may cast something of a shadow over Schroeder's talks with Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi.

Before the closed talks in Beijing, Wen said Schroeder's arrival marked "another family visit" between leaders of the two countries.

Schroeder said the exchanges showed "how important relations between China and Germany are to the German people".

"These relations are not only political and economical, but also have a cultural dimension," Schroeder said. "China and Germany are both big cultural nations and have a lot to give to each other.

"I want to continue my tradition of coming to China every year because I believe that it is significant for the development of our relations," he said.

Leaders of several major German businesses are travelling with Schroeder in China, with Siemens signing a contract to produce 180 railway locomotives worth EUR 360 million.

Earlier on Monday, Schroeder attended a groundbreaking ceremony in Beijing for a DaimlerChrysler plant which is planned to produce 18,000 cars per year, calling the plant "a symbol of the increasing cooperation" between the two countries.

He also attended the opening of a representative office of the German steel group Georgsmarienhuette, making a brief speech urging more small and medium firms to seize business opportunities in China.

Before he left Germany, Schroeder countered criticism of his open policy towards China. "China is one of the most important markets. That's why I don't understand all of those who criticize economic cooperation with it. That helps our people here," he said in Berlin.

Wen was expected to renew China's call for the lifting of an EU arms embargo, which was imposed after the 1989 military crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in Beijing's Tiananmen Square.

Despite opposition from factions within Germany's ruling coalition, Schroeder supports the lifting of the embargo.

The human rights group Amnesty International on Sunday criticised Schroeder's position on the arms embargo and urged him to raise the profile of human rights issues in China.

Officials said Schroeder planned to raise human rights issues but would seek to "recognise and encourage" China's progress.

Schroeder is also accompanied by Transport Minister Manfred Stolpe, Interior Minister Otto Schily and more than 40 German business executives.

He is scheduled to meet President Hu Jintao on Tuesday, before travelling to the northeastern city of Changchun to open a Volkswagen joint venture plant designed to produce 33,000 cars annually.

China is Germany's biggest Asian trading partner. German exports to China rose 25 percent to EUR 18.2 billion last year, while imports from China rose 17 percent to EUR 25 billion.

"little" things such as this that have been brewing in the background are very scary.
 
R

RedOctober

Guest
#2
"little" things such as this that have been brewing in the background are very scary.
Gna gna...

No, just a cookie from the same baker as the Yankees have ;)
 

Jung

???
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#3
gurlgonewild said:
how come no one talks about this type of hegemony?
i found two articles, the implications are interesting. please read at your leisure-this is something everyone needs to be aware of now. let history not repeat itself.
The answer in quite obvious; we're simply not as vigilant or politically versed as you.
 

bigck3000

The Iron Lung
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#4
and we dont have the subscription to the "Word of the Day" service provided by Dictionary.com Today's word hegemony.


he·gem·o·ny (h-jm-n, hj-mn)
n. pl. he·gem·o·nies

The predominant influence, as of a state, region, or group, over another or others.

:)
 

gurlgonewild

Was machen Sie?
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#5
junglizm said:
The answer in quite obvious; we're simply not as vigilant or politically versed as you.
oh so sensitive and immature. one should not contradict the all mighty and all knowing jung for he will post shit replies if he feels slighted. hum.

bigck3000 and we dont have the subscription to the "Word of the Day" service provided by Dictionary.com Today's word hegemony.


he·gem·o·ny (h-jm-n, hj-mn)
n. pl. he·gem·o·nies

The predominant influence, as of a state, region, or group, over another or others.

...ah a jung follower. nothing to add or subtract from the thread eh? ho hum.

regardless of your oh so funny comments full of sarcasm, the point is there is a lot of competition- where annihilation is preferred- in the world.
 

bigck3000

The Iron Lung
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#6
take it easy...you'll find that both of us have no problem debating what seems debatable....I personally agree with your post and would have nothing to say but good job....I thought i'd add a little humor in here but if its not appreciated then i'll abstain next time...sound good?
 

Jung

???
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#7
gurlgonewild said:
oh so sensitive and immature. one should not contradict the all mighty and all knowing jung for he will post shit replies if he feels slighted. hum.
Quite the contrary; I took your statements to be a bit arrogant. . You were seemilgly implying that we’ve all neglected to address these issues, or that we lacked the the knowledge to do so. Forgive me if I was wrong though
gurlgonewild said:
regardless of your oh so funny comments full of sarcasm, the point is there is a lot of competition- where annihilation is preferred- in the world.
Yes, I agree; I partially read the articles while I was at work, but wasn’t able to finish them. I’m actually going to finish them in a few minutes here.

Btw, most of my posts are filled with sarcasm; don’t mistake it as my taking things personal or being over sensitive.