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I’ve got a question.

Stardust

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So, there’s sometime small random questions that pop into my head and probably you guys too get them once in a while. Here’s a thread for offbeat short questions.

I’ll start! In the US, at least in tv and movies your front door goes inward, is this typical? Here they go outwards, much safer. So I just thought it is only so it looks good on tv, to easily break down doors or do your doors go inwards?
 

YogurtExplosion

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So, there’s sometime small random questions that pop into my head and probably you guys too get them once in a while. Here’s a thread for offbeat short questions.

I’ll start! In the US, at least in tv and movies your front door goes inward, is this typical? Here they go outwards, much safer. So I just thought it is only so it looks good on tv, to easily break down doors or do your doors go inwards?
I don't even remember how it swings. I always come in and out of the garage.
 

Stardust

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@YogurtExplosion easier to put the bodies directly in the car with the attached garage.

That’s also a thing! Attached garages, we do have them here, but not really common. Is it just a matter of saving squarefootage or?
 
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Stardust

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@Jung @ib4 yes, but you can’t lift a door from it’s hinges when it’s closed? Does it make it less safer or as safe as doors going in?
 

ib4

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@Jung @ib4 yes, but you can’t lift a door from it’s hinges when it’s closed? Does it make it less safer or as safe as doors going in?
True, but you can blow out the pin and probably use some on-the-go metal cutter make a few slits and pull the door and let it fall. I mean, if you're tuly interested in getting in someones house. The other way around it would be about going through the door, which would theoretically be harder.
 
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Jung

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@Jung @ib4 yes, but you can’t lift a door from it’s hinges when it’s closed? Does it make it less safer or as safe as doors going in?
A hammer and punch and you can just take it off the hinges in <5 min open or closed. It's common in some places here to have screen/glass doors before the entry door, and those swing outwards. Some of them have little metal tabs to protect the hinges but they're pretty flimsy.

You can also reinforce the door frame so it can't be rammed in easily. Dunno if either way is really safer so much as tradition.
 
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Gone-A-Ria

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A hammer and punch and you can just take it off the hinges in <5 min open or closed. It's common in some places here to have screen/glass doors before the entry door, and those swing outwards. Some of them have little metal tabs to protect the hinges but they're pretty flimsy.

You can also reinforce the door frame so it can't be rammed in easily. Dunno if either way is really safer so much as tradition.
K. Thanks for the advice! I'm gonna break into your home now. Thanks!
 

MaxPower

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@Stardust in the US a lot of houses used to have screen doors outside and a solid wood door just inside of that. The screen door was thin and light wood or metal and had mesh screens instead or glass. This allowed you to leave the inside door open for air flow in the hot summers, and still keep the bugs out. The screen door swings out. The solid door swings in.

Now, with the advent of air conditioning; screen doors are less common. However the standard of the in swing door hasn't changed.

It's also worth mentioning that in urban areas most cities have building code that stipulates a door must have an in swing so that someone exiting to the sidewalk doesn't open the door outward into the path of a bypassing pedestrian.....as slap stick comedic as that may seem.
 
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Stardust

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@ib4 @Jung @MaxPower thanks for the answers! The door we have, doesn’t have a pin you’re talking about, it’s more like
A4F590E5-AD57-475F-B87A-2CF995957440.jpeg
where the pin protrudes from the lower one And the top one is hollow. Don’t know if it makes it easier to brake or not. The newer pins are also “thief proof”, how I don’t know. If anyone wanted to get inside our house,they could just brake our window on the door and unlock the door. Lol.

Jung, you mean just blowing off the whole thing that sticks out with a hammer?

And maxpower, now that you mention it my brothers door swings inward, as it goes right out to the street.
 
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Jane Deere

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@Stardust many like the attached garage so that they don't have to go out into the rain /snow to get in the car.

On my front door we don't have a screen door. We have a big glass door that opens to the street and a wooden door that opens inward. My grandma liked to leave the wooden door open and lock the glass door to let the sunlight in.

On my back entrance we have a screen door that opens to the yard with sliding glass window so we can slide it up to let the breeze in. There's a screen in it. Then we have a metal door (i think? Dunno the material) with windows in it that opens inward.

My parents have a similar set up at the front entrance and a sliding glass door at the back. It also has a sliding screen door to let the breeze in. (Fun story, On the first day of having the sliding screen door, our dog got confused and plowed right through it. They didn't even get to enjoy it. Lol)
 
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