WTF ... IS WTF!?
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mother FUCKERS!!!~~~

voldo89

Banned - What an Asshat!
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#1
Is it the subject matter, then, that makes a bad word bad? Not entirely, for sure, for we have euphemisms for bad words -- "poop" for "shit" or "take a leakk" for "piss" or "make love" for "fuck" and this suggests that the subject matter per se isn't the problem either. However the social contexts in which these euphemisms occur has a bearing on their acceptability. A mother can ask of her child, "Do you need to make "pee-pee"?" in a gathering of other mothers. However, I don't think a middle-aged middle-class woman would likely say, "Please excuse me. I need to pee," to a group of middle-class women.

It appears then that the sound of a bad word has nothing to do with its being bad and that while the subject matter provides the source for bad words we have bad words with unproblematic sources (religion being the best example). The inference I draw is that it is the the word itself that is the problem and its boundaries of use are socially prescribed. A guy can say, "I need to piss," to a drinking buddy in a bar but not to a group of people in a formal business meeting.

In addition to the social context, the culture one grows up in has a bearing on what is and is not a bad word and how bad a bad word will be. In 1995, I taught in England and while wearing a fanny pack (a somewhat outmoded small bag one straps around one's waist) and made the mistake of referring to it by that name. That got quite a response from my students. It seems that "fanny" in British English is equivalent to "pussy" in American English. That example provides further evidence that the sound of a word has nothing whatever to do with its being a bad word.

Once while a student at Rice in Houston I found myself in a small gathering of socially prominent people and a middle-aged woman referred to a group of people as "coonasses." I, who am hard to shock, was shocked. I worried that the "coon" part might be a derogatory reference to African Americans and "ass" speaks for itself. That I was in very polite society and an adult woman had said it contributed to my distress. I later found out that "coonass" is just a slang word for cajuns, though not, I suspect, a totally nonpejorative word.

Not long after I moved to Ohio State, a lawyer in the Law School asked me to testify on behalf of a student who had been arrested for the use of "prurient" language (" Arousing or appealing to an inordinate interest in sex" -- Answers.com), which was against the law back then. Our late unlamented Vice President to President Nixon, Spiro Agnew, was in town and a group of Ohio State students was marching up High Street to downtown to protest his being there. As they marched a "street preacher" kept harassing them ultimately prompting one student to say, "Look, motherfucker, how come there's so many of us and so few of you?" A policeman heard this and arrested him on the spot. Later in court, he testified under oath that when he heard that, he instantly thought of someone fucking his mother. That would make the language prurient but it also made the cop either a liar or someone desperately in need of counseling.

I testified that, first, the cop's response was odd on the grounds that "motherfucker" doesn't mean "someone who fucks a/his mother." If it did, sentence (1) would be self-contradictory and it isn't.

(1) Look, motherfucker, I know you don't fuck your mother.
 
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hmmm i read umm almost all of this and i ask you this, mr.smarty pants; how does this apply to entertainment? anyhoo i think this belongs somewhere else.
as for the good words, bad words; i always notice a huge contaversy over it. does it matter now days what catigory it belongs? in each country, there is always a different slang for each word, ie:in england(britan) fag means smoke, in australia(maybe england too) rubber means earaser. so in that context, what does wording really mean? i am going on 31 i say i got to pee all the time, does that make me less classy, or mature? maybe, but i hate walking away mid sentence, i think its rude, and i think saying " i need to piss or i need to urinate" more rud, so i'll stick with pee. who cares what other poeople think of the language, as long as your point gets across. i have been drinking so maybe i don't make sense, but damn, some people are such hard asses? is that the word i'm lookin for or they need to take the pickle out of their ass and relax a bit.
 

screwy

BIG BLACK DICKS
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#3
In yolodo98's own words,

"~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~"
 

Mr.Happy

Go And Die
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#4
when you put a long ass post in you need to have funny pictures randomly placed along the way to keep the reader interested......

i read the first sentence and got bored :redface:
 

icka

fuckoffanddiekthx!
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#5
i dont think any of you read it because it was complete and utter bullshit. whats wrong with you?

this is yet another post i spent my time reading where i could have been masturbating.

let me be the first to say :thumbsdn: STFU