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Motorola announces nanotube displays

Jung

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#1
http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20050510-4887.html
This week, Motorola unveiled a working prototype of its revolutionary new nano-emissive display (NED) in time for this month's Society for Information Display International Symposium in Boston. At 5 inches wide and 1/8th of an inch thick, the high-definition display utilizes atom-sized carbon nanotubes grown directly onto a glass panel. Given proper electrical stimulus, nanotubes can emit electrons with near-perfect conductivity, creating TV images with superior brightness, color, contrast, and viewing angle to today's display technologies.

"With over 15 years experience and 160 patents in carbon nanotube technology and flat panel displays, we have developed a technology that could enable the next generation of large-size flat-panel displays to deliver an extraordinary visual experience at a fraction of current prices," said Jim O'Connor, vice president of Motorola technology incubation and commercialization.​

Nanotube technology is not unique to Motorola; Samsung, SDI and ITRI have all built prototype displays using carbon nanotubes but have run into quality problems. Barry Young, vice president of the flat-panel display consulting firm DisplaySearch, described their method of spreading a carbon-nanotube paste onto glass as "a process compared to putting peanut butter on bread," resulting in a haphazard arrangement of carbon tubes that failed to align in the same direction. Motorola's breakthrough manufacturing technique utilizes a catalyst that grows directly on the glass, providing uniform and accurate positioning of each nanotube.

Cost analysis by industry analysts have speculated that a 40-inch NED panel utilizing Motorola's NED technology could be manufactured for under US$400, and O'Connor predicts that the technology could easily scale up to 42 inches for a TV or computer display. This would place NED screens in direct competition with big-screen displays such as plasma, DLP, or LCD that cost US$2,500 and up. The technology could also see potential applications as large screens in stadiums or as billboard advertising.

Though NED technology has yet to be successful in mass production, Motorola estimates that in a manufacturing environment, it can grow a nanotube in one to five minutes. It also faces competition in the large-TV market from rival surface-conduction electron-emitter displays (SEDs) as well as a continued fall in prices for rear-projection and plasma displays.
Damn, I thouhgt OLED was cool. :thumbsup:
 

Billybob

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dull_bullet said:
cool. but does anyone really need that sharp an image on their phone?
hey, read the whole thing again. It's talking about MONITORS. And a 40 inch t.v. for $400 would kick ass
 

Descent

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Holy shit, this means I could have cheap-ass awesome VR goggles for video games and porn?!

Nice! I forgot to reply two days ago.
 

Cyn

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This technology actually has alot more to offer than just this. Nanotube displays will be much more than just a replacement for monitors and TV's. I've read that with this technonlogy we will eventually have displays with the characteristics of paper. I will also guess that at some point they will even become "touch sensitive" allowing for direct interaction on the surface of the thin, flexible display. Also, I've heard that at some point they will even become a likely replacement for many paper products, like magazines and newspapers. They can obviously display animations so I'm willing to bet that many or most products will be packaged with material that contains Nanotubes allowing for animated designs. The possibilities are great and this technology is certainly going to become an everyday part of our lives.

Another Nanotube use I read about in Popular Science (I think it was) was that we already have paint that fixes itself when chipped or damaged. As with alot of new technologies, the military is testing it on some of their equipment. Eventually we will see it show up in many places though, if what I read was correct anyway.
 

Jung

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The Cheat said:
The manufacture cost is 400, i doubt you'd find someone selling it for 0% profit.
Right, but with in a few months the manufacturering process will be cheaper than that of LCDs. (which still isn’t perfect, btw.) The savings will be passed on to consumers eventually, but like any new technology will be horribly expensive for early adopters.
 

Descent

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Junglizm said:
but like any new technology will be horribly expensive for early adopters.
Lets hope it gets cheap quickly...I really want a cheap-ass big-ass monitor.
 

Jung

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Descent said:
Lets hope it gets cheap quickly...I really want a cheap-ass big-ass monitor.
You should check out the Dell coupons BRiT and I posted. They're practically giving away their 2001FP and 2005FWPs right now.

They have a 6 pixel policy on their LCDs, but you can get unlimited exchanges within the first month for any reason, back light leakage, dead pixels etc. Their new revisions seem to be spot on though, I got mine with no dead pixels and no back light leakage the first try.
 

Descent

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Junglizm said:
You should check out the Dell coupons BRiT and I posted. They're practically giving away their 2001FP and 2005FWPs right now.

They have a 6 pixel policy on their LCDs, but you can get unlimited exchanges within the first month for any reason, back light leakage, dead pixels etc. Their new revisions seem to be spot on though, I got mine with no dead pixels and no back light leakage the first try.
:(.

No money...