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My mother's horse is a turd.

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#1
My mother has this super fancy expensive horse that she does absolutely nothing with. He's a pretty, rare breed, but he's too much horse for her and she's afraid of him. She fell off of him and got a concussion a few years ago, and hasn't ridden him since. She spoils the heck out of him, and lets him get away with all sorts of rude behavior "because he's cute". Unfortunately this cute animal is also 1500 lbs and any naughty behavior is downright dangerous.

I used to have two horses of my own at the stable where she keeps her horse. My grandfather owns the barn, and I was working for him and taking care of all of the horses, not just my own, in order to pay for mine being there. My mom's horse was fine. For a little while, I got really busy with moving and some other things, so I moved my horses to a boarding stable and stopped working for my grandfather. In this time, my mom's horse figured out that he could pull the lead rope out of my mom's hands, get loose, and then graze on the grass outside his paddock on the way inside. My mom would just leave him outside, feed all the other horses their dinner, and then let him in when he was ready. Now he rips away and takes off when ever someone's leading him and he decides he wants a bite of grass. It's not usually a problem in summer when his pasture is lush and he has grass all day, but if he's on dry lot because it's muddy, or if the grass inside is pasture is grazed down in winter, he'll do this. If my mom tries to catch him before he's ready to come in, he kicks at her, and then she just leaves him alone. He's basically been rewarded for ripping out of people's hands when leading him, and kicking at people to get more time out.

Last year, when I realized what was going on, I came by every day after work for a few weeks to work with him. If he got loose, I'd chase him, and not let him stop to graze. I wouldn't let him go inside to eat his dinner either. I'd drive him back into his paddock, lunge him until he showed some respect, and then try again. Only when he walked like a gentleman could he go inside and get dinner, and under no circumstances was he getting any grass that's not inside his own turnout area. I carried a lunge whip so I could chase him out of corners without getting close enough to get kicked. After about 2 weeks, he stopped ripping out of my hands while leading him and he was fine. I made sure my mom was present at all of these sessions, and even made her participate, then I let her handle him on her own again. I work full time, am trying to restore my old fixer-upper house, and I have my own horse to work with. I can't be spending 2 hours every night messing with her horse.

Things were okay for a while, actually for almost a year, but now he's acting like that again, and it's worse. I taught my mom that her horse was turning his head away from her to take away her leverage and use the weight of his body to pull the rope out of her hands. If she pulled his head sideways and towards her, he couldn't throw his weight forward and rip the rope out of her hands. He also couldn't turn his butt to her to kick at her, if she kept his head close. He figured out that she figured that out, so now he's taking his shoulder, body slamming her off balance, and then turning his head away, to throw his weight into the halter and rip away.

I can fix this problem too if I take another couple of weeks to work with him every day, but I know this horse. He's young, and smart, and bored out of his mind without a job. He will keep trying to find ways to manipulate my mom into getting what he wants, even if it means hurting her. He ultimately needs to be sold to someone who will use him, and redirect that restless energy into something constructive. He never behaved like this when he was being ridden regularly. And I'm not just worried about my mom. It's my grandparents too. My grandfather handles him sometimes too, and he pulls the same crap with him. My grandfather is stronger, and more confident than my mom, for now, but he's almost 80 and I worry about him. My grandmother doesn't handle the horses but she has Alzheimer's and can't be left alone, so she's often in the barn when everyone else is, so we can keep an eye on her. I'm worried she'll get run over when that horse gets loose. I keep stressing to my mom that something needs to be done about this horse. He needs to be gone, but she won't hear it. She says she loves him too much blah blah blah. She won't love him so much when he kills her or one of her family members. I can keep trying to train it out, but any training I do won't stick if he's not being handled consistently when I'm not there. Ugh. I have never been so stressed and concerned about something that I really don't have any control over. My family's safety is at stake but I can't get rid of this horse because he's not mine to get rid of.
 

Scooter

Roll me up and smoke me when I die.
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#5
Maybe you can take over operations from your grandfather? He's getting a little old for that. He could give you the barn. Or do you have a better job and it wouldn't be worth it?
 

BrIONwoshMunky

EVERYBODY LOVE EVERYBODY!
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#8
Disobedient animals with willfully ignorant owners perturb me greatly. Whether it's yappy lap dogs, or petulant horses, I feel bad for the animals because they could make someone else a much better companion most times than their current situation allows. About the same as baby princesses and championship Little Leaguers.
 

Scooter

Roll me up and smoke me when I die.
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#9
HEY, don't be talkin' shit on Championship Little Leaguers. I happen to know one and he's a great kid. Good parents and good grandparents.
 

Crazizniac

Particinator
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#10
Scooters got a point, but man there just seems to be some yuppie larva out there that would benefit from a good multi generational famine.
 

gehtfuct

HuGE
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#11
I wish I could help. I love animals and I would do it free of charge.
 

BrIONwoshMunky

EVERYBODY LOVE EVERYBODY!
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#12
HEY, don't be talkin' shit on Championship Little Leaguers. I happen to know one and he's a great kid. Good parents and good grandparents.
I'm genuinely happy for the little dude. Insofar as his parents aren't under the delusion that being in Little League isn't an automatic pass into the MLB and transfer those thoughts to Little Dude a'la ignorant pet owners.
 

ThisIsBananas

Tough guy!
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#13
I have never been so stressed and concerned about something that I really don't have any control over.
Just walk away and let them deal with the problem horse. Stop worrying. They are choosing to deal with a disrespectful horse and that's their decision. You have to decide to not deal with the horse and walk away.

Disobedient animals with willfully ignorant owners perturb me greatly.
I hate this myself. When I'm walking down the sidewalk, somebody's dog snarls at me or tries to bite me, and the owner acts like it's just acting like their cute little puppy that would never do anything wrong. Fucking assholes!
 

Crazizniac

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#14
Oh. sorry TiB I was referring to the Winchester .308 round as a permanent solution for ol' scorpyun. Also known as the Nato 7.62mm I prefer the 160 gr. Speer boat tail chambered in my Springfield armory M-14, it's big enough for a horse but made for a man.
 

ThisIsBananas

Tough guy!
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#15
Oh. sorry TiB I was referring to the Winchester .308 round as a permanent solution for ol' scorpyun. Also known as the Nato 7.62mm I prefer the 160 gr. Speer boat tail chambered in my Springfield armory M-14, it's big enough for a horse but made for a man.
I know.