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Satellite before and after images of New Orleans

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Oppressing your posts...
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#2
place got fucked up... glad to see your ok jung...
 

Jung

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#4
Descent said:
Is your house still standing :(?
Yeah, under about 9ft. of water. :happysad: (never a more fitting use of that smiley)


Well, I say that, but I honestly don't know... I can only go by footage I've seen of the general area. I have no clue how the actual block, street or house have faired though.
 

Boycott

Soul Doubt
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#5
Man jung, that really sucks... Are you going to even go back there after?
 

Descent

Hella Constipated
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junglizm said:
Yeah, under about 9ft. of water. :happysad: (never a more fitting use of that smiley)


Well, I say that, but I honestly don't know... I can only go by footage I've seen of the general area. I have no clue how the actual block, street or house have faired though.
You did get your valuables out though, right?
 

Jung

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#7
Boycott said:
Man jung, that really sucks... Are you going to even go back there after?
New Orleans is my home...
Descent said:
You did get your valuables out though, right?
Some; newer computers and discs, important papers, baby stuff, clothes, pictures, family effects and a few other things. We had to pack everything into a Camaro and 325i so we were pretty limited. We got to take a lot more than some people though. :(
 

dustinzgirl

Banned - What an Asshat!
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#8
I'd go back too, your home is your home, for better or worse. I could never leave Oregon, because that is where my family has always been and will always be.


On another note from www.nola.com, this made me burst into tears. I dont know why, mabye because it was a busload of kids.



Evacuees begin arriving in Houston
By Josh Peter

Staff writer



HOUSTON – This was not how it was supposed to happen, but this is how it did.

Without an escort from Texas state troopers, without being on the official list of evacuees expected to arrive and about 30 minutes after being turned away, the yellow Orleans Parish school bus rolled through the entrance, past the security guards and onto the parking lot leading to the Astrodome. Several children about waved and shouted “thank you,’’ loudly enough to be heard on the other side of the closed glass windows.

A reporter looked at his watch: 12:31 a.m.

So began the arrival of evacuees from Louisiana, with busload after busload on the way and about 23,000 victims of Hurricane Karina in all scheduled to take shelter at the Astrodome. But the first ones admitted, the children and a handful of adults riding on Orleans Parish school bus No. 0235, weren’t on the official list.

Robert Eckels, who as judge of Harris County presides over the Astrodome, said he knew about the “renegade’’ bus and that the indoor stadium wasn’t ready for evacuees – particularly the unexpected arrivals.

“That bus that arrived earlier was a young man who had loaded up a bunch of kids and just gotten into the bus and driven here,’’ Eckels said. “It was not one of those (official) buses. At this point, our plan, our agreement, is to take the Superdome buses.’’

But shortly after Eckels left, the judge was overruled.

Margaret O’Brien-Molina, a spokeswoman for the American Red Cross, discovered the school bus sitting outside the entrance and gave the orders: Let them in.

Yet at the same time, O’Brien-Molina indicated she understands the risk of bringing in too many evacuees.

“You’ve got to go with what the agreement is,’’ she said. “I’m not the one who decided we’re going to take 35,000 people, or 25,000 people or whatever it is. We’ve got to make sure that we can take care of them.

“On the other hand, you got to do what’s right.’’

Col. Pete Schneider of the Louisiana National Guard said this morning that the evacuation of the rest of New Orleans was in full swing. At least 70 buses had picked up refugees from the Superdome, and officials were considering using trains and boats to ship people to safety.

Schneider also said that an executive order allows authorities to take over the state's fleet of school buses, if necessary, to expedite the evacuation to Houston and elsewhere.

When the Orleans Parish school bus came through early today in Houston, a charter bus trailed behind without the joyous sound of children. The first three people off the charter bus were lifted into wheelchairs and pushed past Doug Hamilton, an internist who was prepared to help those who needed immediate medical attention.

Generally, those patients were the dehydrated evacuees who needed to get back on their medication for illnesses like diabetes. But Hamilton also played the role of official greeter.

“The first thing I say to these patients,’’ Hamilton said, “is, “Welcome to Houston. Stay a while.’ ’’

The evacuees were unavailable for interviews under the rules set forth by officials running the relocation effort. But O’Brien-Molina said she was pushing for more media access to the shelter for later today and beamed as she recounted a moment from earlier that night.

When she heard about the school bus, she walked outside the gates and talked with the passengers that included a 5-year-old daughter and the girl’s mother. O’Brien-Molina had decided to let the evacuees in – with or without the required state troopers – and held the 5-year-old girl as the girl’s mother climbed back aboard the bus.

About 20 minutes later, she saw the girl settling by one of the thousands of green cots on the dry floor and under the covered roof of the Astrodome.

“That little girl, think about what she’s been through the last few days,’’ said O’Brien-Molina, who heard about the sweltering heat, malfunctioning plumbing and limited food and water that evacuees had endured before arriving at the clean and cot-lined Astrodome.’’ That makes it worthwhile to me.’’
 

I Hate The FCC

Homo est Deus
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I heard that the US doesn't have enough money to rebuild New Orleans and that if they did it would take 25 years for them to rebuild it and people to live there again, I think we saw the last of New Orleans.
 

Jung

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#10
Lol, what? I don't know where you heard that, but it's ridiculous.
 

Jung

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#12
“I want the people of New Orleans to know that after rescuing them and stabilizing the situation, there will be plans in place to help this great city get back on its feet,” Bush said. “There is no doubt in my mind that New Orleans is going to rise up again as a great city.”
 

I Hate The FCC

Homo est Deus
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junglizm said:
“I want the people of New Orleans to know that after rescuing them and stabilizing the situation, there will be plans in place to help this great city get back on its feet,” Bush said. “There is no doubt in my mind that New Orleans is going to rise up again as a great city.”
"There are WMD in Iraq" -George Dubya

After that I stopped trusting him, well I never did, but you get the point.
 

Darklight

Oppressing your posts...
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#14
I Hate The FCC said:
I heard that the US doesn't have enough money to rebuild New Orleans and that if they did it would take 25 years for them to rebuild it and people to live there again, I think we saw the last of New Orleans.
if the US has the money to occupy and forcefully run another nation on the other side of the globe, we got the money to rebuild a city...and its only gonna take 4 months to pump it dry..
 

POInPR!

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I Hate The FCC said:
"There are WMD in Iraq" -George Dubya

After that I stopped trusting him, well I never did, but you get the point.

:confuse: Dude this guy's home just went down the toilet bowl! :confuse:
Why do you feel the need to crap on what small hope he might have to rebuild what was his?
Man, I live in Puerto Rico and barely got through Hurricane Hugo!
I was Stationed in FT. Gordon when Georges hit P.R. and knocked out communication for about a month... even though that was the worst Georges did to P.R., I still would've knocked the fuck out of anyone that implied that my family and friends and everything else I knew was gonna be blown away...

Listen I don't care what you think about Bush, hell, I personally think he should fall flat on his face like his dad does...Hey, if he comes through with this, more power to him...

what I'm trying to say, is that hope is the last fucking thing you lose before you die. There is no need for people to try and squash it...

Junglizm...
Until you get to go back home... Take Care... I wish you the best.
 

Slacker

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#16
Darklight said:
if the US has the money to occupy and forcefully run another nation on the other side of the globe, we got the money to rebuild a city...and its only gonna take 4 months to pump it dry..
Thats only to pump it dry. It is said to be from 6 months to a year until New Orleans is going to be back to normal. Maybe even longer but thats just pumping it dry. I magin all the houses needing to get rebuilt, new buildings, and practicly a new city. As for as residential goes.
 

leehype

drunk with a jeep problem
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#17
I'm stationed in MD and my squadrin is rebuilding 2 helios to send on det to support the relief effort. Were planning on being there a month.
 

Jung

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#18
Linksy said:
Thats only to pump it dry. It is said to be from 6 months to a year until New Orleans is going to be back to normal.
It will be years before NO is back to 'normal.'
 

Boycott

Soul Doubt
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#19
They better make flood-proof housing (along with hurricane proof) ... Seal every nook that can allow water in with some sort of rubber, ever house should have its own pump, shatterproof windows, and able to withstand high winds/objects hitting them at high speeds...At the front door there should be a drain that runs straight out of the house.... There should be ONLY flood-proof housing built in places below sea level... I understand that NO was built when they didn't know what they were doing, but now that we see what devastation this can cause, we have a chance to start over and make New Orleans at least a safe place to be... It will never be the same, but it will be safe...


one teacher at my school says : "If you live below sea level, you have to know the risks, and by knowing the risks and living below sea level, you're taking a chance" ...



At least after all of this blows over, the Haunted History tours will be raking in the money ... I'd definately go to go on one of those tours ... I was actually planning to go around next year :(
 

void

Banned - What an Asshat!
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#20
A fresh start below sea level

[font=arial,helvetica,sans-serif]It will be difficult, but engineers will somehow make it possible for New Orleans to stay just where it is, writes David Batty[/font]

[font=Geneva,Arial,sans-serif]Friday September 2, 2005


[/font][font=Geneva,Arial,sans-serif]Despite the scale of the devastation Hurricane Katrina has wreaked, it will be feasible to rebuild New Orleans on the same site - but only with a massive overhaul of the city's layout and flood defences, building experts have told Guardian Unlimited. In the aftermath of the disaster, doubts have been raised as to the wisdom of rebuilding a city that lies 7ft below sea level. One Republican congressman, Dennis Hastert, has said it makes no sense to spend billions of dollars reconstructing a city that is so vulnerable to flooding, suggesting much of it "could be bulldozed".

http://www.guardian.co.uk/katrina/story/0,16441,1561790,00.html
[/font]