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Slacking off on promises...

Descent

Hella Constipated
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#1
I promised a friend I'd give him one of my old hard drives. Of course, I have to wipe it for him. Since I am paranoid, I did the "Guten-whatever" method, 30 times for 0's, 30 times for 1's, and 30 times random.

It's been thirty or so minutes now...All I wanna do is sleep. This program is manual, so I'm kind of fucked.

I popped in an old drive I said I would give to a friend on Monday...He needed it quick, so I promised.

I have midterms on Tuesday, and I'm about to fall alseep right now. I wish I didn't slack off on promises.

The bitch is, I have another one I have to wipe and give to him, but he's getting that shit later, to hell with that! I'm tired enough as it is.

Has anyone here ever slacked off on a promise, and then have it bite them in the ass later?

EDIT: Finally, last part, now I can sleep.
 

Jung

???
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#4
dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda bs=512 count=1 :thumbsup:


...Oh wait... you never got Linux running. :(




:cool:
 

Descent

Hella Constipated
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#5
Get this...I couldn't even bring it in today, it was too cold.
 

Jung

???
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#6
Why you'd ever need to zero a drive more than once, outside of a DoD classified environment, is well beyond me. You know it's almost impossible to recover data from a once zeroed drive. Even with professional data recovery equipment, right?

What ever did you have on that drive, Stager?
 

Descent

Hella Constipated
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#7
Nothing, really. Just schoolwork, and some personal, non-pornographic images; that was it. I turst the kid 100%; I just don't want the drive to be exploited if he gets rid of it.

FYI: The FBI standard for not being able to recover any data is having one bit overwrit 9 times, but I'm pretty sure they are lying, so I did 30. I don't know if the future owner of that drive would have incredible tools...That drive has nothing on it that the FBI could use.
 

Fire_ze_Missles

Martha Fuckin' Stewart
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#8
Seems a little like you are paranoid? Plus, I am pretty sure the FBI still isn't after you; don't worry! :thumbsup:
 

Descent

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#9
Missles said:
Plus, I am pretty sure the FBI still isn't after you; don't worry!
I already said that I am wiping it like this in case a future owner has some serious recovery tools, or if he ever sends the drive in to have his data recovered that HE lost.

Now, can we please get back on topic?!
 

ChilianFuckFace

Banned - What an Asshat!
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#10
Descent said:
Nothing, really. Just schoolwork, and some personal, non-pornographic images; that was it. I turst the kid 100%; I just don't want the drive to be exploited if he gets rid of it.

FYI: The FBI standard for not being able to recover any data is having one bit overwrit 9 times, but I'm pretty sure they are lying, so I did 30. I don't know if the future owner of that drive would have incredible tools...That drive has nothing on it that the FBI could use.
Wow dude, you must have some serious issues. First off, a used hard drive is like an old pussy. Once it gets old you throw it out. You don't pass it from generation to generation. You friend seems to have no $ so I do not think he is going to be getting read of the drive. Second, the FBI is not going to care about a bunch of stupid personal pictures and some high school kid homework. Third, if the drives ever goes bad I am sure your friend won't have the $ to send the drive to some place to get his porn recovered.

In conclusion, you have nothing to worry about. Just give the fucking drive away.
 

Jung

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#11
Descent said:
FYI: The FBI standard for not being able to recover any data is having one bit overwrit 9 times, but I'm pretty sure they are lying, so I did 30. I don't know if the future owner of that drive would have incredible tools...That drive has nothing on it that the FBI could use.
Well that's nice, but I specifically mentioned the DoD. The FBI kind of does their own thing. Im sure it's just for some sort of uber paranoia as well. But yeah, even after one zeroing, the data is 99.9% irrecoverable.

http://shsc.info/DataRecovery#titelanker5
http://www.nber.org/sys-admin/overwritten-data-guttman.html

I am of the opinion that the arguments put forward by the gentleman in the rebuttal document are accurate. I have yet to locate anyone on the planet who is capable of recovering useful data that has been overwritten. Having said that, there are a number of people in the field who have successfully recovered overwritten data under certain limiting conditions.
Firstly, the person has to know the nature of the data to begin with. I must admit that I'm not certain as to what extent this familiarity must be, but it sounds to me like you must know what the data is in order to make a determination on what it should be when recovered.
Secondly, the process is very slow - of the order of around 1 kilobyte per hour. Work out how long that would take for you to recover all your mp3 files off a 120GB drive.
Finally, this process is only capable of being performed on low-density drives, such as the MFM encoded drives mentioned earlier.
These issues mean that the recovery of overwritten data is impossible in the real world.

Now some of you are asking "if you can't recover data that has been overwritten just once, why do companies sell software that does multiple overwrites?"
I have an opinion on this, but I can't back it up with any facts. Here it is anyway:
Company A brings out DataDeathstar, a program that will eradicate your rebel files by overwriting them once. This is all you need.
Company B makes a similar product, perhaps without such a copyright-infringing name, but in order to sound better than Company A, they claim they can do multi-pass overwrites. Perhaps they back this decision up with the Gutmann article mentioned earlier.
Now if the cost is the same, Joe User will choose the program with more features - the version that does multi-pass overwrites.
This then precipitates an escalation in the number of wipes any package will perform, to make them sound better than their competitors. Eventually we end up with the Department of Defense 35-pass "standard", or the Bilbo-level Eleventy-billion Insano-wipe.

So why does the Department of Defense specify that huge multi-pass overwrite if one is enough? Once again I can only theorise, as I don't know anyone in that industry who could speak about this topic. Here goes:
Decisions are made by people far above the technical guys on the ground. That is, management types with no techie knowhow. I'm not berating this issue, as it is the same the world over.
At the weekly meeting, one of the subordinate guys points out he read a report from Gutmann about recovering data. It may have mentioned the MFM-issue but that's all techie-speak. The boss decides that he'd rather not risk his career on an issue he can't understand and doesn't have the resources to examine in any depth.
To be safe, he makes sure the standard is some huge amount of overkill, so he can never be determined to be a traitor by allowing data to get into the wrong hands.
This all seems fairly reasonable to me - everyone errs on the side of caution in a field they don't understand.
Also, the military has had loads of data on old MFM technology in their time, and recovery MAY be possible on this gear. Why make multiple standards for different types of drives when your staff may not be able to tell the difference between them?
They also have plenty of manpower, and would be quite happy letting some guys spend their days just wiping data, whether it's a waste of time or not.

Just remember one thing - one overwrite pass is enough to stop anyone recovering your data. If anyone tells you otherwise, tell them to put up or shut up.
It's quite simple to get a floppy disk (or hard disk if they prefer), put some files on it and then wipe them so that they can be recovered with some magical system this person says exists. Make it easy for them and tell them what the file types are if you like - it won't
 

Descent

Hella Constipated
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#12
I don't know how many times I have to say this: The FBI was not of a concern to me, the future owners besides my friend may have some kick ass recovery tools...And I don't want that shit getting out.

I was kind enough to leave a demo version of Unreal Tournament an d Descent 3 on there, as well as a few other games. Maybe I should give him FreeSpace 1 and 2...he used to have some copies, but they were lost :(.
 

Jung

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#13
Descent said:
I don't know how many times I have to say this: The FBI was not of a concern to me, the future owners besides my friend may have some kick ass recovery tools...And I don't want that shit getting out.
I guess you didn't read any of that. :(

You could've done a normal mid level format, had exactly the same results and saved a lot of time. Overwriting the disk more than once does basically NOTHING to protect against recovery in a normal enviroment. Unless you have some uber data recovery software from the likes of the NSA or FBI, and it's used in conjunction with special hardware. (magnetics)

After a normal zeroing, your friend would've only had about .1% chance of recovering your data. Even then, he'd have to know exactly what he was looking for, AND use special equipment. (read: NOT SuperHappyMagicRecoveryTool Xp that he downloaded off P2P.)


Next time, save yourself the wasted time, and pointless redundancy, and just do a normal single pass zeroing.
 

Fire_ze_Missles

Martha Fuckin' Stewart
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#14
Just use Dban . It zero's to DoD specs; and alls you have to do is boot the floppy and press enter! We use it at work here to zero out our drives. :thumbsup: