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Stop Covering The Doors!

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#2
They won't stop until all good classic songs are covered. the destruction of all classic rock n roll, blues, and metal has begun. led the people like that asshole who covered crazy train. I was talking to this one guy that thought that "Let's go" wast he original and "crazy train" was a cover of it. :confuse:
 

breakology

Kiss my Converse
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#3
it is the age of recycling :thumbsup:

but I must agree, covering the doors is a shame. the only songs that should be covered are the ones the blew moose cock since the start.
 

LiberatioN

Trance Addict
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#4
techno is like that, though. It's about sampling pre-made material (most of the time) to create something semi-original. Personally I love that style unless they do mess up and make it sound really bad compared to the original. Rap is just retarded though; I have a feeling it will fade away in the near future...people will learn that hype doesn't last but sometimes the consequences of those actions do.
 

Descent

Hella Constipated
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#5
IHTFCC said:
These shitty techno/rap groups are slaughtering these songs! They need to stop ruining classics. I have proof of this distasteful destruction of such great songs as Road House Blues and Break On Through To The Other Side . And unfortuantly Riders On The Storm . When will these idiots stop? :thumbsdn:
Look on the bright side - It's not emo bands.

LiberatioN said:
techno is like that, though. It's about sampling pre-made material (most of the time) to create something semi-original. Personally I love that style unless they do mess up and make it sound really bad compared to the original. Rap is just retarded though; I have a feeling it will fade away in the near future...people will learn that hype doesn't last but sometimes the consequences of those actions do.
Word. I discovered on my own last Friday night that Descent's soundtrack consists of IMPROVED Nirvana backbeats and riffs. For example, Level 2's first thirty seconds are a mix of Hairspray Queen and Beeswax with metal guitar riffs and scary ambience. It sounds better than either of thlose songs, which are HORRIBLE works of Kurt Cobain. He was great, but I've heard many bands that are FAR superior to Nirvana lately, mainly in the metal scene. Violent Work of Art is one of them.
 

Billybob

Gimmie Pwnies
Premium
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#7
NO! Not Light My fire! It's not even a cover. It's the song coverd with a drum beat.

Descent said:
I discovered on my own last Friday night that Descent's soundtrack consists of IMPROVED Nirvana backbeats and riffs. For example, Level 2's first thirty seconds are a mix of Hairspray Queen and Beeswax with metal guitar riffs and scary ambience. It sounds better than either of thlose songs, which are HORRIBLE works of Kurt Cobain. He was great, but I've heard many bands that are FAR superior to Nirvana lately, mainly in the metal scene. Violent Work of Art is one of them.
You always have to link it back to a old school video game, dont you :rolleyes:
 

WTFNation

"I'm a Song From The 60s"
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#9
Samples

From The Onion, America's finest news source:
Nation's Rappers Down to Last Two Samples

LOS ANGELES--In an announcement that has caused grave concern within
the nation's hip-hop community, the American Society of Composers,
Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP) revealed Monday that only two songs
remain for rappers to sample, Tiny Tim's "Tiptoe Through The Tulips"
and Styx's "Mr. Roboto."

"Such albums as Puff Daddy's No Way Out and Mase's Harlem World have
taken a heavy toll on our nation's precious sample reserves, ASCAP
president Richard Goffin said. "Our nation's rap artists must now face
the consequences of their failure to conserve this all-too-finite
resource."

With such artists as Puff Daddy, Jay-Z, Foxy Brown, Snoop Doggy Dogg,
and Method Man all slated to begin work on new albums in the next six
months, bidding for the sample rights to "Tiptoe Through The Tulips"
and "Mr. Roboto" is expected to be fierce. Puff Daddy, a.k.a. Sean
"Puffy" Combs, has already stated that he is willing to pay up to $20
million for the rights to the ukulele line in "Tiptoe" alone.

"Yo, I got to get that 'Tiptoe' track," Combs said in an interview in
The Source magazine. "I ain't got an album without it."

Styx spokespersons said the band will attempt to maximize profits from
"Mr. Roboto" by selling off the hit song from 1983's Kilroy Was Here
piecemeal. "Our asking price for the song's 'Domo Arigato' spoken-word
intro with synthesizer backing is $25 million," Styx bassist Chuck
Panozzo said. "As far as the lyric, 'My blood is boiling, my heart is
human, my brain IBM,' goes, I can't imagine we would be asking any
less than $55 million for that."

While Monday's ASCAP announcement stunned rappers across the U.S.,
signs of the impending crisis were present years ago. In 1989, James
Brown became the first sample source to be exhausted, when the Jungle
Brothers used a snippet of Brown sneezing during an outtake for "The Big
Payback" on its album Done By The Forces Of Nature. By 1992, the music
of numerous other high-profile artists was exhausted, including George
Clinton, Rick James, Kool & The Gang, Prince and Queen. By 1995,
nearly 80 percent of ASCAP-registered artists were tapped out as
sample sources, including Roxette, Peaches & Herb, Bruce Hornsby,
White Lion and Jon Secada.

Last Friday, the number of unsampled songs fell to two when rapper
Master P paid $12 million for the rights to "Is It Love," the B-side
to the 1986 Mr. Mister hit "Broken Wings."

"This is an extremely serious situation," said Def Jam president
Russell Simmons, whose label--which has featured such artists as
Public Enemy, Beastie Boys, EPMD, and LL Cool J--was responsible for
much of the sample depletion of the mid- to late '80s. "Rappers may
have to wait upwards of 10 years between albums, until there's enough
new popsongs to sample. Other than that, the only solution is for rappers to
come up with the music themselves. Let's just hope it never comes to
that."
LOL! :D It's from a few years ago, but I love it. BTW, I had to look elsewhere to find the story, since The Onion now charges for 'premium' access to be able to see back issues, which used to be free. Ghey.

Cheers,

WTFN
 
#10
I once heard a song where SNOOP DOGG went over Riders on the Storm. All they did was change the music, and had Snoop talking about how much he liked it; that, and Need for Speed Underground 2.