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The Dark Side of the Rainbow

WTFNation

"I'm a Song From The 60s"
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Greetings, Fuckfaces!!! (and I mean that in the NICEST way possible of course!)

If you've never heard of The Dark Side of the Rainbow, it's the cult name for what happens when you watch The Wizard Of Oz whilst playing Pink Floyd's The Dark Side Of The Moon album as a soundtrack. I tried this for the first time years ago, but recently did it again and I'm just as blown away as the first time.

If you don't know what The Dark Side Of The Moon is, then go ask your Dad or your cool older brother (who's much cooler than you.)

This idea has floated around since the album came out in 1973. Until this album came out, Pink Floyd was just another psychedelic rock group, relatively unknown to many at least from a commercial standpoint (although certainly having established a cult following with their rich lyrics and sizzling guitar by David Gilmour). The album stands as one of the most successful (both critically and commercially) albums to this day. It's still a hot seller to a whole new generation of Floyd fans. According to the December 1, 2001 issue of Billboard, Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon has been on the charts for an astounding 1,285 weeks. That's just under 25 years! Its closest rival is James Taylor's Greatest Hits, checking in at 573 weeks on the chart.

The basic premise of it all is that when Roger Waters and the band wrote the album, they wrote it to synchronize to the classic family favourite. Edit: It's probably just a coincidence, though, especially considering that there are still syncs when the album repeats for the 2nd and 3rd time! No, you don't have to be stoned to notice this either. As long as you sync it up right, it will work. It's uncanny, actually. If you listen to the lyrics and are familiar with the movie, you can even pick up references to what's going on in the scene, as well as the obvious timing of the songs.

The trick is synchronization. You need to queue up your CD player (don't use mp3's for this unless it's the whole album on one mp3 and you're SURE it's complete, otherwise the little gaps between the song will fuck up the sync). By this I mean hit play and then pause right away so it spins up and is ready right when you hit play again, without the delay. Turn on the movie, and wait for the BLACK AND WHITE MGM Lion to appear (there's a colour one on some versions of the movie before the black and white mothafucka). He'll roar once, twice, and then right after he roars the third time, unpause your CD player and mute the sound from the movie. Turn it up loud and enjoy...

Just a few of the obvious synchs:
1. In the beginning, right when Dorothy climbs up on the fence and walks precariously on it, the song "Breathe" says "Long you'll live and high you'll fly / but only if you ride the tide / Balanced on the biggest wave / You race towards an early grave" as she falls off the fence into the pig pen. The mood of the scene turns frantic as her uncle and the farm hands scramble to help her out, to match the next song "On The Run" A side note about this: Judy Garland, the actress who played Dorothy, led a troubled personal life and three years before TDSOTM was recorded, overdosed on barbituates in London, perhaps what "you race towards an early grave" is in reference to.

2. Where it REALLY starts to get freaky is at the end of "Time." We find Dorothy just leaving the fortune-teller's trailer as the storm begins to pick up. She starts back towards home just as "The Great Gig in The Sky" starts. This song starts off quite mellow with soft piano playing. Then, right on queue, as a tree branch gets blown at the heroine and the storm really gets fierce, the operatic wailing that characterizes this song starts. As the violence of the storm increases, so does the craziness of the vocal, until Dorothy gets hit with the window and passes out, then it gets calm again, almost dreamlike. And you don't need to read into it too much to point out that the name of the song sort of describes what's happening to Dorothy and Toto in the house, being blown up in the sky to Oz by the twister. As the house settles down and Dorothy gets up, the music is calm again, going silent until she opens the door to the colourized land of Oz and we hear... CHA-CHING! from the telltale intro to "Money"

Anyways, I don't want to ruin it for you. If you haven't tried this, you simply must. You DON'T need to be stoned to see the sync (although it's really cool if you're baked!) The album is only about 44 mins long, so if you put it on repeat, you'll notice some syncs the second time around, but it's not as good as the first 44 mins.

Check it out for more info:Clicky

Cheers All,

WTFN
 

screwy

BIG BLACK DICKS
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#2
Wow. TDSOTM is one of my all-time favourite albums, so I'll try this out as soon as I can. :thumbsup:
 

WTFNation

"I'm a Song From The 60s"
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Well yah, but...

HavokChylde said:
This isn't exactly new, but a nice reminder regardless.


:thumbsup: :thumbsup:
Well, yes, you're right. But I did mention that I'd done this years ago. And that the idea had been floating around for years before that.

But all that aside, I posted this because I had recently watched it again and thought some of the kiddies on here might enjoy something cool. Everyone hears about it from somewhere, and I think it's essential to any music/movie fans, especially anyone who digs Floyd and hasn't done it. :thumbsup: :)