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Yo Fister

BrIONwoshMunky

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#1
Hey @MisterFister , I recently bought a Dry Cut Cutoff saw that uses a 14" 36-tooth TCT blade instead of an abrasive disc. I dulled the blade, and dropped it off at a local tooling shop that sharpens TCT Blades. They said it's going to be somewhere around $11. Thinking that this is fairly reasonable, and just wondered if you have any experience with having/providing this service and what the going rate is in your area.
 
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necro

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#2
A quick google search netted this URL: http://sharpening.bladesllc.com/

Up to an 18" blade, they're charging .30 cents per tooth...not bad, compared to the ~$40 cost of a new replacement.
 

MisterFister

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#3
Seen them. Don't use them. Price seems very reasonable.

Why did you buy it? Every time I see a guy use one online my general reaction is "yuck". Maybe I'm too resistant to change but I'd rather use my Parma.
 

steelasp

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#4
I never knew you could use carbide tipped blades to cut metal. I have so many questions now. How does it cut in comparison to an abrasive disk? Is it faster or slower? Does it cut cleaner? What were you cutting with it, and how long did it take before you decided it needed sharpening?

We used to send our nice 10" table saw blades away to get sharpened, and it would cost around 20 bucks, so 11 dollars sounds like a deal to me.
 

BrIONwoshMunky

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#5
A quick google search netted this URL: http://sharpening.bladesllc.com/

Up to an 18" blade, they're charging .30 cents per tooth...not bad, compared to the ~$40 cost of a new replacement.
They quoted me $10.25 for my blade, assuming before tax and whatnot, so they're right at $.30/tooth.

Seen them. Don't use them. Price seems very reasonable.

Why did you buy it? Every time I see a guy use one online my general reaction is "yuck". Maybe I'm too resistant to change but I'd rather use my Parma.
I bought an Evolution Rage2. I needed a reliable way to cut stock that didn't take up a fuck ton of room, and was somewhat portable. At work, they have the smaller 7 1/4" circular saw style and it seemed to work pretty well, and figured the 14" cut-off version was more useful (i.e. Cheaper) to me at the moment.


I never knew you could use carbide tipped blades to cut metal. I have so many questions now. How does it cut in comparison to an abrasive disk? Is it faster or slower? Does it cut cleaner? What were you cutting with it, and how long did it take before you decided it needed sharpening?

We used to send our nice 10" table saw blades away to get sharpened, and it would cost around 20 bucks, so 11 dollars sounds like a deal to me.
It cuts cleaner and quicker than an abrasive disc cutter, and the parts aren't nearly as hot after. You're basically milling the cut instead of grinding it. I used mine to cut 1/2x6" cold roll steel that I'm going to use as a top for a welding fixture table.

The saw claims you're not supposed to use it for anything bigger than 1/4" wall thickness, and blade life will suffer if cutting larger items. I made 6 cuts through the 1/2" material and I could tell the blade was dull because it was throwing more sparks than usual and was taking way more pressure to get results. At $10-15 for a sharpening, it's still less per cut than I would have paid to have the pieces band cut, and I have a better finish.

It is a project saw, not production, which I am well aware of, and so far I am happy with it.

I've got a better blade ordered than the multipurpose one it came with, so we'll see if that one doesn't fair any better with the heavy cutting.

Once I get the 1/2" plate cut, it'll be used mostly on tubing and stock that is much lighter.
 

MisterFister

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#6
Thanks a lot, asshole. The few number of times I've watched one being deployed I dismissed it. Now you got me digging deeper and clearly the tech is there and I was wrong. Short run aluminum, angle iron, box and rounds look clean, straight and quick.

I guess I'll be updating my "Post your Amazon purchase history" thread pretty soon.

Boy is my Parma gonna be pissed.

(Seriously, thanks. This is going to help)
 

BrIONwoshMunky

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#7
They advertise different blades for ferrous and nonferrous metals, so there's an expense there.

Also, the Evolution I bought seems like it's of lower build quality than other, more recognized brands out there. The one thing I'd like to see on mine is a quick clamp. Dewalt, and I think Ridgid have a clamp that has one of those quick adjust setups that allows you to bypass the threads for quick large adjustments.

Also, the clamp is what changes angle instead of the saw head itself, which means making a permanent fence is going to be a challenge.

But, for quick, small fab cuts, it is in its element.

Blade speed rpm is also 1600ish instead of the around 3000ish for the cheaper abrasive cutoffs, so you can't just plop a blade on a disc machine.

I think you can find the Evolution with the multipurpose blade for around $200, with a dedicated (Freud steel demon 72t from Amazon) replacement blade for around $115, and that's cheaper than buying the machine packaged with the dedicated steel blade from the get-go.

The Dewalt Dry Cut machine is insanely expensive for a hobby, but is probably built better than mine, though I haven't seen any in person.

Also: Here's a direct comparison video:
 
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CoprophagousCop

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#8
I still like my diamond blades.

(Diamonds are a man's best friend.)
 

MisterFister

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#10
Do you use a diamond blade for metal cutting?
Sure...at about 4.7 million rpm with shit flying everywhere and loud as all hell with shit cuts and awesome burrs.

Fine if you're a road worker lobbing stacks of rebar.

Fabrication?

Pass.
 

BrIONwoshMunky

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#11
So, I got my replacement Freud Steel Demon blade in the mail. Not so great on thick metal. The tooth design doesn't rake chips well, so I was getting a lot of blade wobble. Passable for a few cuts in thick metal, but not worth relying on. I haven't used it on smaller stuff yet, I have a feeling it'll work better at that, considering that's what it was designed to do.
 

MisterFister

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#13
A 14" diameter saw that can only cut 1/4" steel? Hmmm. :cautious:
Haha

1/4" WALL

WALL

14" has nothing to do with wall. That saw can cut 6" diameter box or tube 1/4 wall. Straight, cold, dry and virtually burr-free for a couple hundy.

The tech in that blade is impressive.
 

steelasp

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#14
Haha

1/4" WALL

WALL

14" has nothing to do with wall. That saw can cut 6" diameter box or tube 1/4 wall. Straight, cold, dry and virtually burr-free for a couple hundy.

The tech in that blade is impressive.
derp. I was thinking the same thing as @CoprophagousCop but I should know better, as I've used a 14" abrasive disc saw (literally the exact DeWalt saw in the video @BrIONwoshMunky posted) to cut steel tubing etc. during my brief stint working for a scaffolding company. Stupid brain not braining...
 

BrIONwoshMunky

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#15
Haha

1/4" WALL

WALL

14" has nothing to do with wall. That saw can cut 6" diameter box or tube 1/4 wall. Straight, cold, dry and virtually burr-free for a couple hundy.

The tech in that blade is impressive.
It saddens me that this needed explaining.
 

BrIONwoshMunky

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#16
New question. @MisterFister do you casually keep track of upright bridgeport style mill prices in your area? Wondered what one with a bit of tooling is worth. Haven't ever really played with a serious precision tool.
 
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MisterFister

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#17
Are you selling or buying? If you are buying search knee mills. Hearty competitors to Bridgeport can be found. Cost really depends on the state of the machine. You can tell pretty quickly how much its been used. A good but old one can be had for $500. It all goes up from there.
 

BrIONwoshMunky

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#18
Are you selling or buying? If you are buying search knee mills. Hearty competitors to Bridgeport can be found. Cost really depends on the state of the machine. You can tell pretty quickly how much its been used. A good but old one can be had for $500. It all goes up from there.
Hopefully buying. No real purpose in mind, other than to have it take up space in the shop and maybe poke holes in things and cut a slot here and there.

http://indianapolis.craigslist.org/tls/5969867467.html
 
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